Proofreading

An eagle-eye interrogation of your proof.

The proofread is often mistaken for an edit, but it is actually a comparison between the final copy and the printing proof for errors missed in the copy edit, typos, and formatting anomalies.

Do you need a proofread?

If you are submitting your story, collection or anthology to a publisher, no. But a proofread is ideal if you are self-publishing and want to make sure your manuscript is represented flawlessly in its printed form. It is also the perfect option if you want to update and reprint a previously published work.

What does a proofreader look for?

I examine proof contents for grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors, typography and formatting irregularities, and consistency of print elements. My goal is to ensure an error-free proof while meeting design expectations.

  • Proof Content. I ensure that all of the content (scenes, paragraphs, sentences) from the final copy has been transferred to the proof.
  • Grammatical Errors. I complete a light grammar check for subject-verb agreement, tense consistency, misplaced modifiers, etc.
  • Spelling & Punctuation Errors. I compare every letter, space, and punctuation mark to be sure there are no errors or typos introduced in the transition.
  • Typography. I look for irregularities in font (size, face, family, etc.) and spacing (kerning, line spacing, line height, etc.).
  • Formatting. I flag problematic areas, including widows and orphans, ill-fitting text, bad breaks, rivers, lakes, and specialized formatting.
  • Print Elements. I check consistency and accuracy of scene breaks, running heads, page numbers, front and back matter.

What do you get?

  1. Markup. Inline editing in the format of your choosing using the agreed-upon markup system (PDF markup tools, manual markup, etc.). Includes clarifying queries and comments in the margins if necessary.
  2. Style Sheet. Adherence and updates to your style sheet.
  3. Resources and Next Steps. Guidance on next steps for integrating changes into your manuscript.

Once the proofread is complete and you have integrated the changes, you will be ready to go to print.

What does it cost?

The cost of proofreading varies depending on the strength of your story or book and ranges between $0.04 and $0.06 per word (minimum $100).

Ready to get started?

Authors’ Stories

Scroll to Top